AARP-Report-Posted-On-Price-Inflation-for-Generics

AARP Report Posted On Price Inflation for Generics

AARP Report Posted On Price Inflation for Generics

The price of some generic drugs that have been around for years are starting to climb again even after some relief in 2014. As you know with the Pharmacy Industry being a free market, big brand name Pharma companies can capitalize on their existing patent by driving up drug prices because no other company can provide that medication. Once this patent expires, generic drug manufacturers can then create this medication and sell it for a fraction of the cost. This past May, the AARP Public Policy Institute (PPI) released a report regarding drug prices that showed in 2013 there was a 4% decrease in the cost of generic drugs, which is the slowest rate of decline in the previous seven years.

About 27% of generic drugs listed in the AARP PPI had a rise in drug prices, and the price of 97% of brand name drugs increased. A common generic drug that caused “sticker shock” was Doxycycline Hyclate (100mg, 500 count) that went from $20 to a gut wrenching $1,849 in April 2014 (Trxade currently has it listed for $259.39 wholesale). Even though Doxycycline Hyclate has lowered since last year, it is still over a 1,200% increase from 2013. I spoke with a customer at the Pharmacy last week who said her generic birth control that usually costs $5, is now $35 a month. How did this medication become 7 times more valuable overnight?

That’s a trick question, because it didn’t! Even pharmacists are confounded by this change; “When we polled our members about a year ago, they were experiencing a rash of dramatic price increases for generic drugs,” says Kevin Schweers, a senior vice president of the National Community Pharmacists Association, which represents small independent drugstores. “Some of the rises occurred virtually overnight. And it continued to snowball and impact more and more medications” (aarp.org). Generic drug price inflation has been so steep lately, that the Senate Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging held a hearing to investigate. There is no easy answer as to why generic drug prices have soared to double their original price and in some instances as we have highlighted have even risen to over 1,000%!

Some think it’s due to less competition from mergers, others believe it could be caused by an increase in production cost, but the majority of us know that it is most likely unfounded. Panic is starting ensue for the uninsured as they won’t be able to afford some of the generic medications they have grown accustomed to getting at a fraction of the cost, Medicare recipients will experience higher copays or higher percentages, and all taxpayers should be on alert as we take on the responsibility of paying half of the bill for all prescription drugs through government programs. There’s no easy solution on how to combat this unruly price inflation, but further government regulation, price transparency, additional competition (including China which we covered last week), and a simpler coverage system could help.

References:

http://www.aarp.org/health/drugs-supplements/info-2015/prices-spike-for-generic-drugs.html

Teitelbaum, J., & Wilensky, S. (2nd Ed., 2013). Essentials of Health Policy and Law. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning, LLC.


What would you do?

Last week we received a call from a Pharmacist that their patient’s medication had risen in cost and if they were to fill the prescription they would take a $200 loss. They called Trxade and asked us to find it lower for them through our suppliers and asked us to do anything we could so they did not have to tell this patient they could not fill the script. We were able to find it for $280 lower than their primary so not only did we avoid the negative reimbursement for this Independent Pharmacy, we made the transaction a profitable one.

What would you have done in this scenario?

  1. Take the loss and fill the prescription (what goes around comes around)
  2. Not fill the script due to being out of stock (aka take a big loss)
  3. Explain to the client it is a $200 loss and you cannot fill the script
  4. Take the time to find a lower cost alternative for you and your patient

In this scenario, our member took advantage of Trxade’s free concierge service by calling and letting our team find it lower for them. Saved them time, saved them from taking a loss and actually made a profit, and saved the patient relationship. A true win-win for all!

Until Next Wek,

Rx Guru

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